Midas Service Parts

All things car service related including: Air, Oil and Fuel Filters, Wiper Blades and tons more.

Motorcycles

Here you will find all things MOTORCYCLE related including, bike care, spares, lubrication, new products, news and more...

Midas Out Doors

Fishing gear and amazing locations, camping, Braaing as well as tips on entertaining out doors and much more.

Power Tools

If it’s a tool you can plug into a power source, you will find something on that item here. Including awesome videos, articles and DIY specials for every skill level.

Midas Liquids

All things motor liquid related including: Oil, 2 Stroke, Hydraulic and Brake Fluids, Anti-Freeze and all types of additives.

Midas Man-Cave

Articles on some of the coolest tools and gadgets that every man and women should own.

Carwash

A look at all things related to caring for your vehicle, including product reviews and awesome tutorials. A must for all car owners.

Midas Really Cares

A look into the amazing CSI work that Randburg Midas undertake in.

Midas Power

Everything related to all things that make or require power in your car, such as: Batteries, chargers, coils, leads and more.

Smoke Brake

Interesting articles that will help teach you how to spot early warning signs, so that you can attend to them before disaster strikes.

Road Tripping

Features on where to go road tripping, what to pack, what’s required for your Mozambique trip, safety tips and more.

Blog

  • Funnel Time

    When the drinking funnel comes out, you know it time to go big or go home #Tooltime The ultimate beer drinking funnels, for the ultimate party animal! Funnel head Attachable/ Detachable Pipe Attachable/ Detachable Control Valve Ideal for parties and games Bachelor’s party gift Birthday party gift for adults Source and Available from www.barstore.net Product use is strictly for ages over 18 years+. NO DRINKING AND DRIVING!

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  • What does the Distributor Caps do?

    If you have ever wondered what does the distributor caps do, then wonder no more #MidasPower Randburg Midas stocks distributor caps, rotors and points for all makes and models of cars. Distributor caps and rotors are responsible for passing the voltage from the ignition coils to the engine’s cylinders in order to ignite the fuel-air mixture inside and power the engine. The coil connects directly to the rotor, and the rotor spins inside the distributor cap. When the rotor’s tip passes a contact on the cylinder, a high-voltage pulse travels from the coil to the cylinder via the rotor. That pulse jumps the little gap between contact and rotor and moves on to the spark plug wire, eventually igniting the spark plug on the cylinder. Because of all the high-voltage activity, the rotor and cap have to be replaced relatively frequently. They wear out easily. The distributor cap and rotor are part of the ignition system, which has to work in concert with the rest of the engine in order to ignite the fuel at the proper time. The idea is to maximize the output of the expanding gases in the engine by lighting them so that they produce heat and the fuel turns to exhaust. The exhaust increases the pressure in the cylinder and pushes the piston down. The idea is to create as much pressure as possible inside the cylinder, thereby maximizing torque and power. Plus, the more efficient the cylinders are, the better the car’s mileage will be. Therefore, the real catch to the coil-distributor-cylinder system is timing. Since there’s a short delay between when the spark is created and when it ignites the mixture in the cylinder, the spark has to happen before the piston reaches the top of its stroke. That way, by the time the spark arcs its way across the gap between the rotor and the cylinder, the piston will just reach the top of the stroke and the pressure will be able to build up as it descends into its power stroke. Source: auto.howstuffworks.com

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  • The Difference between Gasoline and Diesel Engines

    The Difference between Gasoline and Diesel Engines is a must know for every car owner #MidasLiquids At Randburg Midas you will also find stock of the oil your car needs Just like regular gasoline engines, diesel engines require regular maintenance that involves changing the lubricating oil that keeps your vehicle’s parts running smoothly. If you can change the oil on a gasoline engine, you can change the oil on a diesel — just be aware of a few differences. Because diesel fuel is sometimes called diesel oil, be aware that the oil you have to change is not the fuel oil but the oil that lubricates the engine. This job requires lubricating oil that’s specially designed for diesel engines — not gasoline engines. After you understand that distinction, the actual work involved is the same as it is for conventional vehicles except that you have to do the task more often on a diesel. Be sure to check your oil dipstick at least once a week, and change the oil filter every time you change the oil. Don’t be surprised if you change the lubricating oil in your diesel, run the engine for two minutes, and check the dipstick only to find that the new oil has turned pitch black; this is normal and not a reason to change the oil again immediately. Your owner’s manual tells you the maximum interval you can wait between changes, but the more often you change the oil on any vehicle, the longer the vehicle will live and the healthier it will be. That goes double for diesels because extreme heat and pressure help to contaminate the lubricating oil more quickly. The cost of having a professional change the oil on a diesel engine can be from two to four times greater than on a gas engine. This may be extra motivation for doing this relatively simple job yourself. Because the procedure is the same, all the instructions for changing oil and oil filters in conventional vehicles are relevant for diesels except for the oil classification codes. As new and improved oils appear on the market, these codes have changed from the original CA to CB to CC, and so on, up to, currently, CJ. Each new level can replace previous ones, and the earliest oils are considered obsolete. Unless your vehicle is several years old, your owner’s manual will list the proper API category oil to…

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