Author Archive

  • Bad news for motorists

    Bad news for motorists: Biggest petrol, diesel price hike ‘in SA’s history’ “Mid-month unaudited data from the Central Energy Fund (CEF) is predicting the biggest fuel price hike in South Africa’s history by some margin,” reports the Automobile Association (AA) which has monitored the fuel price data from 1 September to date. The AA said: “A spike in international oil prices and a huge swing in the Rand/US dollar exchange rate have combined to predict a knockout blow at the pumps at the end of September. “Based on the current data, petrol users will be paying R1.12 more per litre.” The AA says diesel users who will be hit hardest, with a possible price hike of R1.38 per litre, pushing diesel to within a whisker of R16 per litre. The AA said: “To put this in perspective, should this increase materialise, it will push the price of 93 unleaded octane fuel inland close to R17 a litre, off a January price of R14.20 – a total increase of around 20%, year-to-date.” The Association also points out that a massive hike in the diesel price will be especially catastrophic for the agricultural sector which is already reeling from the prolonged drought. It says that extreme fuel price hikes could push marginal businesses, including farms, to a financial breaking point, and have a massive negative impact of consumer pricing. “While we earnestly hope the picture improves before month end, we once again call on the government to urgently address the policy and structural issues which have put fuel users in the front line of the Rand’s weakness,” the AA concludes. How will you survive this massive fuel hike? How has it affected your monthly budget? Let us know in the comments below. We would like to end off by giving a shout out to Wheels 24 for sharing this great article. For more information: Call or WhatsApp (082) 882-6324 | (011) 789-4411 / (011) 036-0200 | marco@midasrandburg.co.za | 191 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg. We want to see you! Show us your auto styling projects @RandburgMidas Source: https://www.wheels24.co.za/Fuel_Focus/motorists-to-be-hit-extremely-hard-with-upcoming-monster-fuel-hikes-aa-20180913

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  • Car safety features to look out for

    With new innovation in the automotive industry, there has been great headway made in the overall safety of vehicles. So let’s see what the key safety features to look out for when buying a new car are. A big thanks to Giorgio Express for the great article! Whether you’re shopping for a used or new car, it’s important to spend time making sure it’s safe. First off, you should take a test drive and try on the seat belt to make sure it fits well and is comfortable. Check that head restraint, roof structures, and windshield designs don’t interfere with your ability to see clearly. And try to conduct your test drive in the evening so you can check the visibility provided by the headlights. To help you better understand what to look for we have put together this list. Seat Belts In the event of a crash, seat belts are designed to keep you inside the vehicle. They also reduce the risk that you will collide with the steering wheel, dashboard, or windshield. New seat belt designs have the following additional features that improve seat belt performance: Adjustable upper belts. An adjustable upper belt lets you change the position of the shoulder strap to accommodate a person’s size. This feature may encourage passengers to wear their belts since it increases shoulder belt comfort. Seat belt pre-tensioner. Pre-tensioners retract the seat belt to remove excess slack, almost instantly, in a crash. However, you still need to adjust your seat belt so that it fits as snugly as possible since pre-tensioners are not powerful enough to pull you back into your seat in the event of an impact. Energy management features. Energy management features allow seat belts to “give” or yield during a severe crash to prevent forces on the shoulder belt from concentrating too much energy on your chest. These features include “load limiters” built into the shoulder belt retractor and/or “tear stitching” in the webbing that causes the seat belt to extend gradually. Rear centre seat lap/shoulder belts. Some manufacturers provide a rear centre lap/shoulder belt. This added feature is especially beneficial to older children and children in booster seats who are often seated in the rear centre position. Air Bags Depending on the speed at impact and the stiffness of the object struck, front airbags inflate to prevent occupants from hitting the dashboard, steering wheel, and windshield. Side airbags reduce the risk…

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  • Awesome Facebook store

    Have you seen our awesome Facebook store yet? Have a look now to see some of the latest special offers and hottest products on offer. Click here to visit it now. We have got something for everyone. So regardless if you are looking for a simple multimeter or complete clutch kit, you can rest assured knowing you will find exactly what you are looking for at Randburg Midas. For more information: Call or WhatsApp (082) 882-6324 | (011) 789-4411 / (011) 036-0200 | marco@midasrandburg.co.za | 191 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg. We want to see you! Show us your auto styling projects @RandburgMidas

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  • Know your rights at a roadblock

    With the holiday season upon us, so the police presence on the roads will increase. Know your rights if and when you are stopped either in a roadblock or by a police officer. To start off we would like to say thanks to Anthony Whatmore for this great article and information. Below are some articles giving advice on what to do when being pulled over. Understand that these articles are guides and do not replace the advice of your lawyer. Most drivers are uncertain of what their rights are when stopped at roadblocks or confronted with suspicious police behaviour. Be aware of these points when confronted by real or alleged police officers: Note that under South African Law uniformed South African Police Service members (SAPS) have the same powers as uniformed traffic officers (JMPD) or other Metropolitan police forces.* *The word police used in the body of this document refers to both of the above. Roadblocks If stopped at a roadblock you have the right to: • Ask for the person’s police certificate of appointment which includes his picture, name, rank, force number and where stationed: Section 334 (2) (a) of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 • If these details are not given, you can ask to see the roadblock commander or most senior officer on the scene • If you have any doubt about the authenticity of the roadblock, you can ask to be taken to the closest police station • If the roadblock is legal, you have the right to ask what its purpose is. Even so, the person is not compelled to tell you if the reason is classified. The number of vehicles being stopped may indicate the status of the roadblock • You have the right to be treated with respect at all times and have the further right to get the details of any officer who has treated you unjustly • You must co-operate with all reasonable instructions, but you can question your position should you feel that a violation of your constitutional rights or your rights under the Criminal Procedure Act, 51 of 1977 is occurring • You must at all times treat any officer with respect and the dignity attached to his rank and office, although you may be firm in upholding your legal rights • You must identify yourself as the driver of the vehicle and supply proof of your driving license. Your constitutional…

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  • Improve your braai food photography skills

    We would like to wish all South African’s an amazing and happy Heritage Day. To celebrate we would like to share these awesome tips to improve your braai food photography skills. If you follow these easy photo hacks you will be capturing that perfect braai memory that will last a lifetime! So let’s jump right in! When Shooting Outside, Avoid Shooting in Direct Sunlight – even though Braai’s looks great in sunlight to the naked eye, shooting in direct sunlight can lead to harsh images that have high contrast, blown out highlights, bad shadows and colours (such as BBQ sauce) that often appear overly saturated. Move into the shade, make your own shade, or wait for some cloud coverage. You’ll find that diffused light evens things out and that beautiful chops will shine every time. When Shooting Inside, Find the Light – Short of investing in proper studio lighting, shooting a great braai image indoors is a pretty tall order. The artificial light in homes and restaurants, whether standard or florescent is simply not ideal. Diffused sunlight is still your best bet, and there’s usually at least one window that does the trick. Choose a window with lots of natural sunlight pouring in and use that light. However, the rule about direct sunlight still applies, so you’ll likely need to diffuse or soften the light. Try taping large pieces of white parchment paper over the entire window to act as a diffuser. You can also use a sheer white fabric curtain, a plain white bed sheet, or even a lightly opaque shower curtain… a clean one. Vary Your Angles – I often shoot an image three ways, (1) directly overhead looking straight down, (2) at about a 45 degree angle, and (3) just about parallel with the food. You can shoot the same food at these 3 perspectives and get 3 very different images. Every now and then I’ll shoot at, what’s known in the biz, as a Dutch angle. This is where you tilt the camera to create a slanted horizon line. Shoot Close – Zoom in tight on the food and really fill the frame with that delicious braai meal. I want people to almost taste the image. Sure, you can always crop an image later, but it never feels quite the same. Shooting tight will also give you those great shallow depth of field images that really make an image stand…

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