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Archive for April, 2015

  • Sunflowers and mountains

    In this week’s episode of the South African road trips 5 week series, we look at Bloemfontein to Durban, Sunflowers and mountains (Bloemfontein to Durban, 670km/416mi) #Roadtripping This mission through farmlands and foothills in the heart of South Africa begins on the freeway from Bloemfontein, the Free State capital, to the mountain kingdom of Lesotho. JRR Tolkien was born in Bloem, but Jack Kerouac will more readily come to mind as you zip through endless sunflower fields; the blue sky is immense, the tractors are rusty and the pastoral flatlands contrast with the mountains ahead. From Ladybrand, with its sandstone buildings surrounded by jagged peaks, the route winds along the Lesotho border and through the Free State’s Eastern Highlands. This is one of South Africa’s most scenic drives, passing snow-covered peaks in winter, amber foliage in autumn and relaxed country villages all year round. Overlooked by the Maluti Mountains, arty Clarens is a picturesque pit stop; some 20 galleries crowd for space on the town’s main street and grassy square, alongside boutiques, restaurants and a brewery. Nearby, antelope run alongside the road in the Golden Gate Highlands National Park, famous for its sandstone outcroppings and spectacular sunsets. If you don’t fancy camping or hiking, drivable roads head high into the hills above the park’s shimmering grasslands. Leave a few days to travel from here to Durban on the coast, and meander through one of Africa’s greatest ranges, the Drakensberg. The peak-studded Royal Natal National Park is nearby, with plenty of walking trails – including a chain ladder up the 8km/5mi-long curtain of rock, the Amphitheatre. Source: www.lonelyplanet.com

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  • Funnel Time

    When the drinking funnel comes out, you know it time to go big or go home #Tooltime The ultimate beer drinking funnels, for the ultimate party animal! Funnel head Attachable/ Detachable Pipe Attachable/ Detachable Control Valve Ideal for parties and games Bachelor’s party gift Birthday party gift for adults Source and Available from www.barstore.net Product use is strictly for ages over 18 years+. NO DRINKING AND DRIVING!

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  • What does the Distributor Caps do?

    If you have ever wondered what does the distributor caps do, then wonder no more #MidasPower Randburg Midas stocks distributor caps, rotors and points for all makes and models of cars. Distributor caps and rotors are responsible for passing the voltage from the ignition coils to the engine’s cylinders in order to ignite the fuel-air mixture inside and power the engine. The coil connects directly to the rotor, and the rotor spins inside the distributor cap. When the rotor’s tip passes a contact on the cylinder, a high-voltage pulse travels from the coil to the cylinder via the rotor. That pulse jumps the little gap between contact and rotor and moves on to the spark plug wire, eventually igniting the spark plug on the cylinder. Because of all the high-voltage activity, the rotor and cap have to be replaced relatively frequently. They wear out easily. The distributor cap and rotor are part of the ignition system, which has to work in concert with the rest of the engine in order to ignite the fuel at the proper time. The idea is to maximize the output of the expanding gases in the engine by lighting them so that they produce heat and the fuel turns to exhaust. The exhaust increases the pressure in the cylinder and pushes the piston down. The idea is to create as much pressure as possible inside the cylinder, thereby maximizing torque and power. Plus, the more efficient the cylinders are, the better the car’s mileage will be. Therefore, the real catch to the coil-distributor-cylinder system is timing. Since there’s a short delay between when the spark is created and when it ignites the mixture in the cylinder, the spark has to happen before the piston reaches the top of its stroke. That way, by the time the spark arcs its way across the gap between the rotor and the cylinder, the piston will just reach the top of the stroke and the pressure will be able to build up as it descends into its power stroke. Source: auto.howstuffworks.com

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  • The Difference between Gasoline and Diesel Engines

    The Difference between Gasoline and Diesel Engines is a must know for every car owner #MidasLiquids At Randburg Midas you will also find stock of the oil your car needs Just like regular gasoline engines, diesel engines require regular maintenance that involves changing the lubricating oil that keeps your vehicle’s parts running smoothly. If you can change the oil on a gasoline engine, you can change the oil on a diesel — just be aware of a few differences. Because diesel fuel is sometimes called diesel oil, be aware that the oil you have to change is not the fuel oil but the oil that lubricates the engine. This job requires lubricating oil that’s specially designed for diesel engines — not gasoline engines. After you understand that distinction, the actual work involved is the same as it is for conventional vehicles except that you have to do the task more often on a diesel. Be sure to check your oil dipstick at least once a week, and change the oil filter every time you change the oil. Don’t be surprised if you change the lubricating oil in your diesel, run the engine for two minutes, and check the dipstick only to find that the new oil has turned pitch black; this is normal and not a reason to change the oil again immediately. Your owner’s manual tells you the maximum interval you can wait between changes, but the more often you change the oil on any vehicle, the longer the vehicle will live and the healthier it will be. That goes double for diesels because extreme heat and pressure help to contaminate the lubricating oil more quickly. The cost of having a professional change the oil on a diesel engine can be from two to four times greater than on a gas engine. This may be extra motivation for doing this relatively simple job yourself. Because the procedure is the same, all the instructions for changing oil and oil filters in conventional vehicles are relevant for diesels except for the oil classification codes. As new and improved oils appear on the market, these codes have changed from the original CA to CB to CC, and so on, up to, currently, CJ. Each new level can replace previous ones, and the earliest oils are considered obsolete. Unless your vehicle is several years old, your owner’s manual will list the proper API category oil to…

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  • Air Compressor

    We take an in-depth look at how your air compressor works #Powertool Come and speak to use at Randburg Midas for all of your compressor needs. We have you covered from hoses to coupling to complete compressors of any size! Years ago, it was common for shops to have a central power source that drove all the tools through a system of belts, wheels and driveshafts. The power was routed around the work space by mechanical means. While the belts and shafts may be gone, many shops still use a mechanical system to move power around the shop. It’s based on the energy stored in air that’s under pressure, and the heart of the system is the air compressor. You’ll find air compressors used in a wide range of situations—from corner gas stations to major manufacturing plants. And, more and more, air compressors are finding their way into home workshops, basements and garages. Models sized to handle every job, from inflating pool toys to powering tools such as nail guns, sanders, drills, impact wrenches, staplers and spray guns are now available through local home centers, tool dealers and mail-order catalogs. The big advantage of air power is that each tool doesn’t need its own bulky motor. Instead, a single motor on the compressor converts the electrical energy into kinetic energy. This makes for light, compact, easy-to-handle tools that run quietly and have fewer parts that wear out. Air compressor types While there are compressors that use rotating impellers to generate air pressure, positive-displacement compressors are more common and include the models used by homeowners, woodworkers, mechanics and contractors. Here, air pressure is increased by reducing the size of the space that contains the air. Most of the compressors you’ll run across do this job with a reciprocating piston. Like a small internal combustion engine, a conventional piston compressor has a crankshaft, a connecting rod and piston, a cylinder and a valve head. The crankshaft is driven by either an electric motor or a gas engine. While there are small models that are comprised of just the pump and motor, most compressors have an air tank to hold a quantity of air within a preset pressure range. The compressed air in the tank drives the air tools, and the motor cycles on and off to automatically maintain pressure in the tank. At the top of the cylinder, you’ll find a valve head…

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